'Swedish Coastal Houses' by Eskil Skans
'Swedish Coastal Houses' by Eskil Skans
'Swedish Coastal Houses' by Eskil Skans
'Swedish Coastal Houses' by Eskil Skans
'Swedish Coastal Houses' by Eskil Skans

'Swedish Coastal Houses' by Eskil Skans

Regular price
AU $565.00
Sale price
AU $565.00

artist: Eskil Skans (Swedish 1905-1989)

medium: oil on board 

dimensions: 50 x 30 cm board size  / 62 x 42 cm framed size (approx)
signed
circa 1950s/60s
presented in its original frame

AU $565 (approx US $420 / 380 EUROS / 50,500 yen / 320 GBP - for exact current conversion visit xe.com)

artist biography
Gustaf Eskil Skans was born December 10, 1905 in Eskilstuna. He was a Swedish painter and illustrator.

Skan’s parents were Karl Gustaf Skans - major in the Salvation Army and Augusta Sjöstedt. In 1934 he married Helga Wiktoria Chronbäck. Their son was the illustrator and graphic artist Bengt Skans.

Skans studied at the Tekniska skolan in Malmö between 1923 and 1927 and privately for Anders Olson in Malmö 1940 to 1941. He took private study trips to Paris, southern France and Italy.

He first exhibited in the early 1940s. Skans had solo shows at the SDS-hallen in Malmö and at galleries in Trelleborg, Lund and Limhamn. Alongside Ulla Borgström, he exhibited at Malmö City Hall in 1944, and with Karl Enock Ohlsson in Ystad.
He participated in group exhibitions arranged by Skånes konstförening in Malmö and Lund as well as in Hörby konstförening’s exhibitions. Other group exhibitions include ones in various Scanian towns. He was one of the participants in the exhibition Fem akvarellmålare (Five Watercolour Painters) at the Kristianstad Museum in 1954.

Skans painted landscapes and still lifes in oil or tempera, but he was perhaps best known for his watercolour paintings. In his early work, he painted figure studies, genre-like town square and amusement scenes with a naive touch, harbour and coastal scene with boats. In addition to his fine at, he was active as a newspaper illustrator. Skans is represented in the public collection of the Kristianstads Museum.

He passed away in 1989.